We can turn King Street into downtown’s front porch

One of the first things I noticed about Toronto when I moved here from Vancouver was that it didn’t have much opportunity to stop and just hang out on the street.

Streets were far narrower than they were in Vancouver and there just wasn’t as much room for seating. And yet this is one of the best things to do on a street—just sit and watch people go by. If parks are our shared backyards, then great streets are our shared front porches.

I’ve been thinking about this a lot since the King Street Pilot started in Toronto. At its core, the pilot is about movement—specifically moving the most people the most efficient way along the street, which is by streetcar. The pilot restricts cars from travelling right through intersections to help speed up streetcar travel.

But the King Street Pilot is also a chance to talk about how streets can be places to linger, to stay awhile and experience the city, as well as places of movement. Because the pilot has also opened up 21 new public spaces out of parts of the roadway–spaces the City calls a “relief valve” for pedestrians on crowded sidewalks.

I’d rather think of it as an opportunity to create a bunch of front porches along the street.

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This is a chance to rediscover how streets can be a part of our public space system, in a way that we haven’t had the opportunity to do so before on such a scale and in such a visible way as King Street. I also hope this paves the way for this kind of transformation of car space to people space in other parts of the city, particularly areas outside the downtown where streets are wide and intimidating.

Some people call these spaces parklets—the name given to small public spaces constructed in parallel parking spots along streets. These were first seen in San Francisco and soon popped up in cities all over North America. I’d rather we just drop that name, which feels like a tired too cute trend by now, and just call it regular old public space.

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These public spaces are not going to be ones that can accommodate a soccer field or a kid’s playground or a dog park, but they can contribute in a big way to the social space in our city.

We’ve done this before along Church and, in a larger way, as part of the John Street Pilot, which saw the sidewalk space extended into the roadway and Muskoka chairs and picnic tables scattered throughout for the summer.

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These spaces don’t have to be fancy—they just have to be open, flexible, accessible, and comfortable. While some cities use them as spaces to create more outdoor patios for restaurants and cafes, I hope we preserve them as publicly accessible to everyone–whether you’ve purchased something or not.

It would also be interesting to see them each take on a different character. The King Street Pilot, which runs from Jarvis to Bathurst, goes through a few different neighbourhoods with their own flavours. The public space created in front of St. James Park offers a different opportunity than one near Spadina, for example.

They also offer opportunities for experimentation. One of the interesting things about San Francisco’s parklets is that they are all different, and some of them are truly strange.

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While I wouldn’t want to see the whole route taken up by weird concept spaces (although I’d love if someone turned one of them into an outdoor library/reading room), it would be great to see some interesting, strange ideas for how they can be used. Indeed, the City seems open to this. During the winter there will be a call to residents, businesses, and organizations on how to use these spaces, including some “creative installations.” Artists, take note.

We likely won’t see the full potential of these new public spaces until spring comes around to us again in Toronto, but when it does I’ll be there often, sitting on the front porch of the city watching everyone go by. Maybe in that reading room?

Photo credits: title image from Paul Krueger (Flickr CC), King Street Pilot map and John Street photo from the City of Toronto, and the two parklets are here and here.

 

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